Welcome everybody.

Normally on the Monday following a UFC event, you’d expect to find the “morning after” report in the same prediction post, but since I have more to say than just after thoughts about my picks, I decided to do it in a whole new post of its own. More fun for you, I guess.

Let’s start with the original purpose.

The Morning after:

  1. Much like Joe Rogan, I was watching out for Jordan Mein to show us again why he’s considered such a promising young man. And not that he didn’t. THe first round was his, and he was able to do more than Thiago. The second round brought us Thiago “The Pitbull” Alves. With a beautiful body kick (More on this later) he enabled Mein enough to allow him to swarm with a perfectly legal knee to the head and a couple of punches before earning the TKO. 0 for 1.
  2. Tim Boetsch always come to work. For the majority of the fight he showed why he’s called the Barbarian. Leites did continue to show improved striking skills and held his own for the most part, though the strength differences were pretty obvious in the strikes. Then, Thales was finally able to bring the fight to his world, on the ground and after Boestch did the unthinkable and escaped the first attempt of Leites’ arm triangle, he was locked in a second one and Leites earned the submission victory. 1 for 2.
  3. I was fairly confident in this prediction. Though Lauzon is by far, no pushover, I just believed in Iaquinta’s chin and strength. It was a fun fight like any of Lauzon’s and Iaquinta eventually found the openings he needed and just punched Joe all over the cage (more on that later). 2 for 3.
  4. The crowd booed for the majority of the fight and if you don’t understand MMA, you’d think they were right. What the Vegas douches need to understand are two things. First, when two fighters with knock out power meet, especially when both are knocking on contender-ship door, they are likely not going to stand in front of each other and risk getting knocked out for your entertainment. If they would, I’d seriously doubt their legitimacy. The second thing is that, as opposed to most of the booing “fans”, these two are willing to get into the cage and fight. Easier said than done. Not a great fight, but a fight non the less. Woodley by a hair. 2 for 4.
  5. In the main event, Anderson Silva came back from a horrible injury to prove to himself that he could still do this. Nick Diaz… well, I just don’t know. Never was a fan of Nick (more of Nate). The constant whining, the delusional speeches, the childish behavior… He calls for fights then comes in and spends half of the time taunting (time he could be using to score points), then he’s frustrated. I don’t know. Silva dominated for the vast majority of the fight and clearly won. 3 for 5.

You can watch highlights (Credit: mmaweekly.com) at the bottom of this post.

Now. Having said all that, I wanted to say a few things about fighter’s safety. These thoughts were always bouncing in my head, but I decided to write a little about it after this last week’s weigh in, as well as some of the recent fights.

We all like a good, action packed, aggression filled fight. We love us some knock outs and submission victories. Hell, there were quite a few fights that went the distance and were so full of action, we didn’t really want them to end. That’s why MMA is such a great sport. But what’s the price?

Fighters want to be champions. That is great and motivating. Without the competitive aspect, this sport would be WWE. But what’s the price?

I want to consider a couple of things, with your permission. Or without it, heck, it’s my blog.

Weight Cut

I view weight cut as the necessary evil to allow for a reasonable pairing. It’s not a n easy task for anyone, let alone those who cut a significant amount of weight in order to get to a lower weight class than they might seem to belong to. The motivation is clear. I might be a smaller Middleweight in frame, or height, or reach, so let me drop to 170 and be a big welterweight. Makes sense. Except it doesn’t.

Weight cut might seem trivial, but our bodies are not expecting this dramatic change, nor do they like it. Ask Kelvin Gastelum, or Jimy Hattes. You know what? Ask the new Light-Heavyweight challenger – Anthony “Rumble” Johnson who kept missing weight at Welterweight! A guy like Rumble who is a big LHW, trying to cut all the way down to 170. He’d gas out and not taken seriously. And that’s just the less significant aspect of standings in the organization.

My humble opinion is – if you can’t make weight with relative ease – seriously consider a heavier weight class. It would likely be better for both your health as well as your chances to succeed. And we won’t have to read about you being rushed to a hospital hours before a fight…

 Training Regime

Now I won’t go telling professional MMA fighters how to train. First, because I’m no expert on the matter, and second due to the fact tat the sport is relatively new and still evolving. It’s still somewhat a learning process and we can see new techniques being developed in different camps. Here, I only want to suggest that again, safety should come first. It’s frustrating for fans to see GSP, or Cain Valasquez, or Chris Weidman having to pull out of a an anticipated title fights. I’m sure it’s even more frustrating for the fighters themselves. After all that’s their livelihood.

So if I may use a TV term. Be safe out there!

Stoppages

Let’s talk about that touchy topic for a minute. Some fights end with a definite KO. The fighter is out, period. Some fights end with a tap-out. clear-cut. But what about those TKOs? And the submissions with no taps?

How many times did the referee stop a fight, only to spark the whole “Early stoppage or not?” argument? Or on the flip side – how many times did you wonder whether the referee should’ve stepped in earlier than he did?

Now, again, we want entertainment, but my humble opinion is – better if a fight is stopped a little earlier (to the best judgment of the ref) than too late. The safety of the fighter ensures that we’d be able to watch him fight again. It beats the alternative. We do not want unnecessary career risking injuries or god forbid death in the cage.

That’s it folks. Just wanted to get this out there and perhaps get your perspective on Fighter safety Vs. Fan entertainment Vs. Fighter’s goals and aspirations.

As usual, feel free to leave a comment, share, like and all that🙂

Enjoy the highlights from UFC 183 below.

P.S. HERE IS an interesting article. Benson Henderson moving up to 170. Along the lines of what I said in the above, that may very well be a really good step for the champ.

P.S.S. LISTEN to what Anthony “Rumble” Johnson has to tell Kelvin Gastelum and John Lineker about weight management.

Thank you,

2 thoughts on “(Fighter) Safety first

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